Category Archives: Chess

Chess Tournament 6

If you do have an appetite for tough challenges, GRENKE Chess Open 2019 is out there! As the organisers decided to connect GRENKE Classic with GRENKE Open in previous years the number of participants increased substantially. Thanks to that, now we have the largest chess open in Europe. I did also participated to last years event and you can read my observations and experiences from the first hand.

GRENKE Chess Open takes place annually in Karlsruhe, Germany and this year it will be the fourth consecutive event. It is open to all players from around the world and it is expected that more than 1.500 players, almost 300 out of them with titles from Candidate Master (CM) to Grand Master (GM), will be present for the challenge. The tournament has three categories with various strength levels and this year total prize pool is increased to 70.000 EUR, that is 10.000 EUR more than last years. In addition to that, players will have the chance to share the same venue, due to GRENKE Chess Classic, with the top class players from the chess world. Players for this year’s Classic are as following:

GRENKE Chess Open will be held between 18 – 22 April, 2019 with 9 Rounds Swiss-System. Pairings will be determined by a computer and time-controls are: 2h for 40 moves + 30 minutes for the rest of the game. For further details and registration information please visit the event’s official website, where you can also follow the games live. 


Ergun UNUTMAZ, 01.03.2019


World Chess Championship

The World Championship 2018 took place this year in London, United Kingdom, between November 09 and 28. Magnus Carlsen, the reigning world champion, was challenged by Fabiano Caruana. The twelve-game match ended in 6-6 and having not even a single win by either side was a record. Then tie-breaker games came to the fore and Magnus Carlsen made his presence felt.

In a four-game  rapid round, worlds No.1 ranked at this speed, Carlsen made already two wins and was comfortable at the beginning of third round, as a draw would be enough for him to proclaim his victory. However things were opposite for Caruana, as he needed absolutely a win to continue. Under these circumstances we had a chance to watch a party that goes to the edges, but in the end Carlsen won that game, too.

As a result he managed to retain his title. He will carry the World Chess Champion title until the next championship, which will be held in 2020, but with an obvious fall in his tremendous performance and a strong rivalry by Caruana make things more interesting for the future. But now it is time to cherish the moment and enjoy this victory! Afterwards of course learn precious lessons from his strategies and matches. Last but not least, in addition to having the proud of such an honour, Magnus Carlsen also won the 55% of a million-euro prize solely from this event.

You can check the news and parties from the official FIDE broadcasting link below: 

World Chess Championship 2018: https://worldchess.com/

 

The World Championship 2016 was held in Manhattan, New York between November 11 and 30. The current champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway and his challenger Sergey Karjakin of Russia had 6 points from 12 game classical series, each with a win. Then at the tie-breaks Carlsen had two draws in the first two parties than with two consecutive wins managed to defend his title. 

Photo: https://www.dw.com

The World Championship 2014 was the first tournament for the two-year cycle decision. After Magnus Carlsen has just toppled Viswanathan Anand in 2013, it was time now to defend the World Chess Champion title against him. The tournament took place in Sochi, Russia from November 07th to28th. At the eleventh game of twelve round series Carlsen declared his victory with three wins and seven draws.   

Source: FIDE Database – https://de.wikipedia.org/

 

Ergun UNUTMAZ, 29/11/2018

GRENKE Parties

During the tournament I played 9 games in 5 days, 4 hours a game on average. At the end, I managed to get two wins and a draw (a stalemate better to say due to a rush). All in all, I am happy to return to the chess world with such a challenging tournament and now I have much to do, starting by learning from my mistakes. I will also add a short commentary, but here you can view my parties by clicking any move.

Chess Tournament 5

After giving a long break to professional chess, playing in Europe’s largest chess tournament will be a great challenge for me. It is arguable that whether it is a good idea or not to join such a strong tournament without a solid preparation, but I believe that these kinds of challenges actually make us stronger. Therefore, I am set to go on facing it at GRENKE.

 

GRENKE Chess Open takes place annually in Karlsruhe, Germany and this year it will be the third consecutive event. It is open to all players from all around the world and as of today more than 1.500 players, almost 300 out of them with titles from Candidate Master (CM) to Grand Master (GM), have been already registered. The tournament has three categories with various strength levels and total prize pool of 60.000 EUR. In addition to that, players will have the chance to share the same venue, due to GRENKE Chess Classic, with the top class players from the chess world. Participant list of the GRENKE Chess Classic for the year 2018 is given below.

GRENKE Chess Open will be held between 29 March und 02 April, 2018 with 9 Rounds Swiss-System. Pairings will be determined by a computer and time-controls are: 2h for 40 moves + 30 minutes for the rest of the game. For further details and registration information please visit the event’s official website, where you can also follow the games.

Ergun UNUTMAZ, 26.03.2018

 

————— ∞ ∞ ∞ ——————

As the tournament goes on at full speed a detailed report will come in later. However for those, who are interested in, I can say that it is an organisational success. For more than 1.500 participants, everything is very well planned and thought in advance. In this regard I am very pleased to a part of it. Secondly, participants all over the world bring not only variety, but also a very tough challenge to the tournament. Last but not least, long hours of matches and two rounds a day schedule make you really tired and vulnerable to small mistakes, for which there is no room in such a competition. On the other hand, these are no excuse for my failures and I am glad with my own performance and creative ideas during the parties. So far, we have reached to the end of the fifth round and I achieved only 1,5 points out of 5 possible, by missing two obvious wins. Here is the Participant List for the Group B

Ergun UNUTMAZ, 31.03.2018 

 

————— ∞ ∞ ∞ ——————

The tournament is over and with what a great sensation! 14 years old IM Vincent Keymer (ELO 2.403) had left 60 Grand Masters behind and won the trophy with a 2.800 ELO performance. In addition to that he reached a record of 8 points in 9 games, with two draws. That is a record, compared to previous two years’ 7,5 points. Bravo! 

Competition in Group A was fierce. I haven’t seen before so many titled players in a room. Luckily, I have made contacts with some of them and got received some good tips. If you are interested in chess, I think that being present in such a venue is a must and if you are a club player, it provides a good motivation for your future career. 

When it comes to Group B, in which I took part, it was also very challenging and a uniqe experience. I started the tournament at 485th place among 530 players and if you did told me before the tournament that I would reach 2,5 points I would have doubted that. But after achieving good positions and coming up with creative ideas during the parties, I feel sorry for the lost points. I could definitely make 4 or 4,5. That’s a real pity! On the other hand, I had a chance to weight my strength and now I know in which fields I need a fine-tuning or strong improvements. Here are two positions from different parties, in both I have managed to find the losing moves that surprised the engine.

In this position above with a good central breakthrough idea of f3 – fxe4 I made the first move and against to g4 I did not follow the plan; not grabbed the g4 with f3, but played 18.hxg4?? instead. Unbelievable.

  

And at this first round game after Black’s 12. … f5 move, I completely and unnecessarily weakened my King’s defense line with the move 13. h4? (13. … h6 14.Qc3 g5 15.g3 Rg8 16.Kg2 gxh4). As if it was not enough, I slept the Knight at h4, as g3 was already pinned (17.Nxh4??). After that the party was already lost.  

Ergun UNUTMAZ, 03.04.2018 

 

 

Mathematik des Rutschsystems 2

Es wurde verstanden, dass das System für die Spieler, die am Ende der Tischreihe immer seinen Platz (1, 3, 4 oder 6) hält oder 2 Spieler (16 oder 3-4) halten ihre Plätze an den Ecken, erfolgreich läuft. Trotzdem ist das Rutschsystem problematisch, wenn ein Spieler in der Mitte  (2 oder 5) festbleibt.

“Ergun und Roman haben das Thema an Schachabend analysiert und sind zu folgenden Erkenntnissen gelangt.

Szenario Spieler 2 Mitte bleibt sitzen. Das Problem liegt an den Ecken.  Betrachtet man die linke Ecke spielt nach dem rutschen der Spieler am linken Eck jeweils gegen seinen Vorgänger. Der Spieler am rechten Eck gegen seinen Nachfolger. (-1/+1) Dies bedeutet, wenn Spieler 1 nach 2 Runden die rechte erreicht wiederholen such die Paarungen der ersten Runde für die Ecken mit vertauschten Farben. Für Spieler bleiben die Paarungen korrekt. Dies bedeutet ein Spieler am Eck muss sitzenblieben, dann gibt es keine Kollisionen, da (-2/+2) Wie mann die Paarungen danach repariert wurde nicht untersucht.”[1]

Hier sind die Runden, wenn der Spieler 2 in der Mitte sitzen bleibt und die Paarungen für alle Spieler. Man kann es sofort bemerken, dass die Paarungen für die bleibenden Spieler korrekt ist aber es gibt Wiederholungen für alle anderen Spieler.

Wenn der Spieler 2 sitzen bleibt, folgt das Rutschsystem nicht mehr einem perfekten Kreis, weil die Reihenfolge gebrochen ist. Da der Spieler, der in der Mitte bleibt, den Kreis stört, brauchen wir eine Korrekturmechanismus. Eine der möglichen Lösungen ist, das noch ein anderer Spieler, der an der Ecke sitzt, fest an seinem Platz bleibt. Am unteren Beispiel habe ich Spieler 1 und 2 an ihren Plätzen sitzen gelassen und hier sind die Ergebnisse.

Das Rutschsystem läuft wie früher beschrieben und alles ist in Ordnung bis zur letzten Runde. Da die zwei fest bleibenden Spieler nicht auf einander treffen, machen wir eine Änderung und jeder trifft den anderen. System funktioniert nicht reibungslos aber befriedigend.

 

Ergun UNUTMAZ, 11.01.2018 

 

[1] Aus dem Beitrag von Roman Tutschka.